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How Cold Weather Impacts Your Bod

How Cold Weather Impacts Your Body

As the weather gets colder, you may experience more aches and pains, and even feel like your muscles are stiffer. This is more evident for people who work outside, or individuals with certain ailments. The cold weather can increase the risk of suffering from musculoskeletal (MSK) injuries and can even increase the intensity of certain conditions.

How Can the Cold Weather Impact Us?

If you live with an arthritic condition you might find that your symptoms may be exacerbated by cold weather conditions, which can keep you away from doing the activities you enjoy. Conditions like rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis may not react well to sudden weather or atmospheric changes, which may worsen symptoms.

Even without any specific conditions, most of us are very aware of how our bodies feel and move when we are cold – we may move slower and walk around when our muscles are tense and stiff. This can result in soreness that we may not experience otherwise. For those who work outside, be conscious of your working conditions. Feeling warm, safe and comfortable is important as heavy lifting and overexertion can increase risk of injury in colder temperatures.

Here are a few things that can be done to prevent stiffness and MSK-related injuries during the winter months:

  • Maintain an active lifestyle – make sure you are doing some form of physical activity to exercise your muscles and joints
  • Dress warmly – wear proper clothing to keep your body warm and protected from the cold
  • Wear proper boots that are waterproof and warm, and have good threads to prevent falls
  • Wear a warm hat – keeping your head warm reduces the amount of body heat that escapes from your head.
  • Do not stay out in the cold for too long – if you work outside, move indoor during your breaks if possible.

The winter months shouldn’t keep you from doing the things you love, or keep you indoors in pain. Keep active and dress warmly, and you may be able to minimize the aches and pains of the season. Your chiropractor can also help you manage your condition-related pain during the winter months, and help you prevent MSK conditions if you work outdoors.

For more information contact one of our expert chiropractor.

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Staying in Motion Universal Wellness Source

Staying in Motion

7 reasons to stay active

It’s never a bad time to keep the simple things in mind

Over the past 20 years, exercise has become an important aspect of health care. It’s no surprise that it’s important to stay active. From the perspective of your spine, muscle, and nervous system experts, here are a few important reasons for you to stay active:

  1. Relieve low back pain
    Exercise has been shown to have a positive long-term effect on low back pain. Core strengthening exercises, especially, have been shown to be very effective in improving the function of your back.
  2. Improve bone health
    Current evidence has shown that exercise can increase bone density and decrease the risk of falls and fractures in the elderly. Studies have also shown that exercise is comparable to medication in improving the day to day functioning of people with osteoarthritis.
  3. Prevent obesity
    Obesity is often connected to the development of many life-threatening illnesses (e.g., diabetes or high blood pressure). There is strong evidence showing that exercise is important for preventing weight gain as well as keeping your body weight stable after you’ve shed some pounds.
  4. Improve your mental health
    Physical exercise has been shown to have a positive effect in the long-term management of psychological symptoms, including depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, and chronic stress!
  5. Help manage diabetes
    Diabetes is a common illness affecting millions of Americans every year. Researchers around the globe have all found that exercise is one of the pillars of managing diabetes along with diet.
  6. Prevents your risk of cancer and cardiovascular disease
    There is more and more evidence showing that exercise can help protect you from developing cancer in the colon, breast, uterus, and prostate. Studies have also shown that exercise lessens your risk of developing heart disease because it helps reduce the amount of fats and cholesterol in the body (both play a role in damaging your arteries).
  7. Improve brain health
    Studies have shown that individuals who exercise regularly have a decreased risk of developing dementia. Exercise has also been shown to improve balance and function in individuals with Parkinson’s disease.

Improve your overall health by making exercise a part of your daily routine. If you want to learn more about managing your health with exercise, contact your local chiropractor.

Pain changes everything. Chiropractic care changes pain.

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Decoding Nutrition Labels

Decoding Nutrition Labels

Food and nutrition labels on food are packed with helpful information. Often they’re our go-to source for calorie, fat, and carbohydrate information, but they have a whole lot more to communicate to consumers.

Here are some fast facts about what information you can find on food labels, and what it really means:

  1. All ingredients lists are sorted by weight.

That’s right, the first item on any ingredients list is the one that weighs the heaviest in the product, and goes down in descending order. If you’re keeping an eye out for certain ingredients (of which you want more or less) their order on the list can be a clue to guide you. 

  1. Some foods make nutrition claims.

For better or worse, packaged foods will often come with claims that explain the value of certain nutrients, such as “low in sodium,” “high in fiber,” or “a good source of iron.” Sometimes those claims go a step further and explain why that value is good for your health, such as: “A healthy diet containing foods high in potassium and low in sodium may reduce the risk of high blood pressure, a risk factor for stroke and heart disease.”  

  1. Information on nutrition facts tables are based on serving sizes.

Serving sizes are important measurements to consider before you look at calories or any other nutrient breakdown on the list. The serving size can vary between products, and it’s often much smaller than the amount you would serve yourself if you’re not paying attention. It can help you understand how much of certain nutrients you’re eating, compare nutritional values between similarly packaged products, and gauge the amount of food you’re actually eating.  

  1. The term “%DV” means the percentage of your daily value.

In addition to serving size and calories, there are 13 core nutrients that are listed on every nutrition label: fat, saturated and trans fat, cholesterol, sodium, carbohydrates, fibre, sugars, protein, vitamin A, vitamin C, calcium, and iron. The percentage of your daily value requirement for most of these items is noted by %DV at the end of each line, and it’s based on the recommended serving size. If it’s less than 5%, that means it’s a very small amount, and if it’s more than 15%, it’s more significant.  The helpful thing about %DV is that it makes it easier to compare different products and make more informed food choices about what you want and need in your diet. 

  1. Not all foods must have a nutrition facts table (but most do).

By law, nearly all packaged food must have a nutrition facts table. However, there are a few food items that don’t require one: fresh produce, raw meat and seafood, onebite candies and snacks, milk sold in refillable glass bottles, individual servings of freshly prepared food intended for immediate consumption, and in-store fresh foods like bakery items and salads. On the upside, sticking to fresh produce means you don’t have to worry about preservatives or sort through any ingredients lists since there’s only one ingredient! 

  1. Calories mean energy.

We’re often told to watch our calories and think of them as an intimidating little number directly linked to putting on weight. That’s not necessarily the case. Calories represent the amount of energy in food, which come from carbohydrates, fats, and protein, all of which are necessary for proper nutrition. Your body uses this energy to perform all its daily tasks, and we need to eat enough to replenish the calories we use throughout the day. When it comes to nutrition labels, whether or not we follow the serving suggestion can be more important than counting calories.

Looking for more guidance on healthy food choices? Contact your friendly chiropractor today!

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